ANGER ON MY MIND

Archive for December 2007

In a matter of months Todd’s Anger Management Solutions has dominated the anger management market in Charlotte, North Carolina. For this we would like to thank all our clients who saw it fit to allow us to help them in their journey towards anger management. Happy Holidays to all and we look forward to serving you in 2008

Carlos Todd, LPC, NCC, CAMF

President of the American Association of Anger Management Providers

Anger Management/Executive Coaching of Charlotte, North Carolina

www.masteringanger.com

www.masteringanger.org

www.angeronmymind.com

www.aaamp.org

  • Carlos Todd was appointed president of the American Association of Anger Management Providers
  • Gregory Kyles moved to establish the Anger Management institute of Texas as the leader in anger management in Texas
  • George Anderson’s website http://www.andersonservices.com broke records in internet saturation for an anger management site
  • Angeronmymind.com became a premier anger management blog
  • Executive coaching for physicians became the most sought after anger management service nationwide
  • A record number of anger management sites were established
  • Several major anger management contracts were negotiated
  • masteringanger.com became a the leading anger management site on the east coast
  • George Anderson, Carlos Todd, Gregory Kyles, Shannon Munford and Colbert Williams joined forces to get the word out regarding the presence of a nationwide network of anger management providers
  • Carlos Todd was featured in a primetime interview on the Charlotte CBS TV station
  • George Anderson was featured in several magazines
  • Carlos Todd released his first book-Your Emotional Profile

Carlos Todd, LPC, NCC, CAMF

President of the American Association of Anger Management Providers

Anger Management/Executive Coaching of Charlotte, North Carolina

www.masteringanger.com

www.masteringanger.org

www.angeronmymind.com

www.aaamp.org

Undoubtedly, this is fueled by the new JCAHO requirements for “disruptive physicians”, which went into effect on April 1, 2007. The Joint Commission on the Accreditation of Hospitals issued new guidelines for all hospitals relative to “disruptive physicians”. This requirement calls for hospitals to establish written policy to deal with this growing impediment to patient care and treatment and team effectiveness.

Because of the complex issues involved in working with physicians, Anderson & Anderson, Inc. has decided against referring this client population to our network of anger management providers. This is based on their limited training and experience in coaching physicians and lack of knowledge of medical establishments. As a consequence of this decision, the in-house faculty at Anderson & Anderson has and will continue to provide on-site coaching for “disruptive physicians” nationwide.

With demand for anger-management coaching outstripping the supply of trained providers, it’s important to vet providers very carefully. Anger issues exhibited by “disruptive physicians” touch on a variety of issues—stress management, anger management, emotional intelligence, communication etc., and sometimes cross into the realm of psychology. In order to avoid situations where the coach slips into becoming a psychotherapist, we have decided that is best to limit our coaches for physicians to Licensed, Experienced, and Clinically trained coaches.

As hospital administrators and directors increasingly recognize the benefit of anger management, they are pushing it downward into their organizations and to all physicians who are in need of it. More and more of our clients are now recommending executive coaching of anger management to high-potentials at junior and executive levels.

A list of hospitals for which we have provided coaching are listed below:

Partial Executive Coaching/anger Management Hospital Client List

St. John’s Hospital
Santa Monica, California

Cedar-Sinai Medical Center
Los Angeles, California

Santa Monica Hospital Center
Santa Monica, California

Midway Hospital
Los Angeles, California

McHenry Hospital
McHenry, Texas

Harlingen Baptist Hospital and Medical Center
Harlingen, Texas

Hospital Corporation of America
Richmond, Virginia

Kaiser Permanente
California

UCLA Medical Center
Los Angeles

Southwest Georgia Health System
Brunswick, GA

John C. Lincoln Hospital
Phoenix, AZ

For more information about our Executive Coaching/anger Management for Physicians, please visit our website at http://www.andersonservices.com or contact our office at 310-207-3591.

George Anderson, MSW, BCD, CAMF, CEAP
Diplomate, American Association of Anger Management Providers
Anderson & Anderson, The Trusted Name in Anger Management
http://www.andersonservices.com/
ttp://www.aaamp.org
http://www.linkedin.com/in/geoanderson
http://www.anger-management-resources.org

Carlos Todd, LPC, NCC, CAMF

President of the American Association of Anger Management Providers

Anger Management/Executive Coaching of Charlotte, North Carolina

http://www.masteringanger.com

http://www.masteringanger.org

http://www.angeronmymind.com

http://www.aaamp.org

 

 

 

In April 1, 2007, the JCAHO (Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations) established standards for all American Hospitals relative to disruptive physicians.

These new standards have opened a floodgate for psychologists, psychiatrists and coaches to become immediate experts on providing intervention for “disruptive physicians” with or without credible training or experience.

Some tips for selecting a reputable provider:

* What is the intervention model used?
* Does the model include an assessment component?
* Is the assessment specifically designed for anger, stress, communication and empathy?
* Does the model include a Pre and Post Test?
* Is aftercare included?
* Does the intervention include psychotherapy or psychotropic medication?
* Is the intervention provided on-site?
* Does the intervention include envivo observation?
* Ask for a list of Hospitals for which the provider has provided this intervention.
* See if the provider is listed with the Federation of Medical Licensing Boards.

George Anderson, MSW, BCD, CAMF, CEAP
Diplomate, American Association of Anger Management Providers
Anderson & Anderson, The Trusted Name in Anger Management
http://www.andersonservices.com/
http://www.aaamp.org
http://www.linkedin.com/in/geoanderson
http://www.anger-management-resources.org

Carlos Todd, LPC, NCC, CAMF

President of the American Association of Anger Management Providers

Anger Management/Executive Coaching of Charlotte, North Carolina

http://www.masteringanger.com

http://www.masteringanger.org

http://www.angeronmymind.com

http://www.aaamp.org

What if it was just a big misunderstanding? What if anger was really a important emotion in the development of the self? What if anger could be use effectively to set boundaries? What if… I content that the understanding that many have about anger is very much off track. We need anger. Anger is a good an necessary emotion. Anger is part of the minds way of seeking it place in the world. From very young we begin to realize who we are and when this is challenged anger is our way of setting boundaries. If is our way of saying, “This is who I am and I am not sure that I am willing to integrate our values, beliefs or ideas.” Anger ensures that we are individuals separate and distinct from the rest of the world.

However in the same way that we can have too much of any emotion, when anger that is too frequent, too severe, too long lasting and leading to aggression it has essentially gone bad. Learning to effectively use our anger is a skill that can give us peace of mind in knowing that we have maintained who we are with integrity and have not violated the rights of others in the process. It is a fine line that we all will need to learn to walk.

Carlos Todd, LPC, NCC, CAMF

President of the American Association of Anger Management Providers

Anger Management/Executive Coaching of Charlotte, North Carolina

www.masteringanger.com

www.masteringanger.org

www.angeronmymind.com

www.aaamp.org

In the animal kingdom differentiation is the hallmark of survival. Slight changes in the physical characteristics can help animals survive. In humans we have created complex languages that allow us to describe and differentiate among items that are the same so that we can communicate our needs—in a real way communicating these needs accurately has much to do with our emotional and physical survival. I becomes more complex when we have to communicate intangibles like emotions. We feel them but like air we cannot touch them. However make no mistake they impact the way we make decisions every day.

Sadly with something as complex as our emotions many have given little consideration to making differentiation in our emotional vocabulary. We are content to say we feel good or bad. Essentially there is little differentiation. That is like saying that the car one likes is a good car or a bad car when we really want to say the car is a “fuel efficient, hybrid that feels great to drive.” What a difference.

An emotional vocabulary helps us differentiate. It moves us away from a gut feeling to words that clearly define the emotional need that one is seeking to me met. It is the difference between saying, “I feel sad,” and, “I feel rejected.” It is the difference between saying, “I feel angry,” and, “saying I feel undermined.”

Learning to differentiate means knowing where to look to meet the emotional need and what the need is. To not differentiate is like hearing an internal noise that is undefined, but loud and hard to ignore. This undifferentiated noise can often lead to rage directed at others. Therefore differentiation can help the individual find relief to long standing emotional pain buy making that “noise” a clearly defined set of emotions. Stay tuned for more on this topic.

Carlos Todd, LPC, NCC, CAMF

President of the American Association of Anger Management Providers

Anger Management/Executive Coaching of Charlotte, North Carolina

www.masteringanger.com

www.masteringanger.org

www.angeronmymind.com

www.aaamp.org

 

Did you know that our values and beliefs can often fuel our anger towards others? If we value time management, organization, hard work, serenity etc our minds are always seeking to create an environment in which these values are fostered. Unfortunately because  the world does not revolve around the individual, learning to live with others who do not subscribe to our values is an important key to reducing chronic and explosive anger.

Each individual needs to have a mental inventory of what he or she values. This awareness will help the individual have clarity about what drives them so that in situations where their anger begins to emerge because of a strongly held value they can remind themselves that this belief may be mine but not theirs. Such a mindset can promote dialogue and reduce conflict.

The starting point in not allowing our values and beliefs to create explosive anger is to know what we believe. Do you know what you believe?

Carlos Todd, LPC, NCC, CAMF

President of the American Association of Anger Management Providers

Anger Management/Executive Coaching of Charlotte, North Carolina   

www.masteringanger.com

www.masteringanger.org

www.angeronmymind.com

www.aaamp.org

 


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